2.16. Using simulation trackers

This example illustrates how trackers can be used to analyze simulations.

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import pde

grid = pde.UnitGrid([32, 32])  # generate grid
state = pde.ScalarField.random_uniform(grid)  # generate initial condition

storage = pde.MemoryStorage()

trackers = [
    "progress",  # show progress bar during simulation
    "steady_state",  # abort when steady state is reached
    storage.tracker(interval=1),  # store data every simulation time unit
    pde.PlotTracker(show=True),  # show images during simulation
    # print some output every 5 real seconds:
    pde.PrintTracker(interval=pde.RealtimeIntervals(duration=5)),
]

eq = pde.DiffusionPDE(0.1)  # define the PDE
eq.solve(state, 3, dt=0.1, tracker=trackers)

for field in storage:
    print(field.integral)

Total running time of the script: ( 0 minutes 9.504 seconds)

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